Week 6: Building Digital Fluency Within the Classroom

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Teaching students to use online programs is a great way to build their digital fluency in the classroom.  This week I learnt about the importance of being digitally fluent. Often being fluent in one skill set, will result in using these skills to become proficient in other areas using digital technology. This is important in a world that is increasingly digital, and will make students confident, digitally literate and employable in the future.

During this week we were required to use Scratch, a free online animation software that teaches a basic understanding of programming. An animation will require students to use reasoning skills as well as developing their digital literacy. Students can express a great deal of creativity through the software, whilst also challenging and building their digital fluency. Children today are considered digital natives, so its vital that teachers are just as digitally fluent as their students, Prensky (2001).

See my first attempt at using Scratch by clicking image below:

scratch_mit_lab

How can you use Scratch practically in the classroom? See the below link, “Teaching Kids To Think Using Scratch” (Betcher, 2012), for a teachers perspective of using programming to teach problem solving, thinking mathematically and using logic and reasoning.

http://chrisbetcher.com/2010/10/teaching-kids-to-think-using-scratch/

 

References

 

Betcher, C. (2012). Teaching Kids To Think Using Scratch. Retrieved from http://chrisbetcher.com/2010/10/teaching-kids-to-think-using-scratch/

 

Prensky, M. (2001). “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1”, On The Horizon, Vol. 9 Iss 5: MBC University Press.

 

Scratch, Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab. Retrieved from http://scratch.mit.edu

 

 

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